Digital Humanities

What is Digital Humanities?

Digital humanities (DH) is a discipline at the intersections of the humanities with computing.  DH studies human culture -- art, literature, history, geography, religion -- through computational tools and methodologies; and, in turn, DH studies the digital through humanist lenses.  Digital humanists analyze languages through digital text collections; build digital archives of forbidden booksconstruct video games to study literature; or resurrect historical cities through digital maps.

In our Digital Humanities courses, students learn about the intellectual landscape of digital humanities scholarship.  They also learn a basic Digital Humanities skillset:  how to build digital stories, exhibits, and maps; how to digitize rare books; how to analyze collections of data; how to construct digital models and 3D-print them.  And students gain a critical perspective on digital technologies, learning to consider their social, cultural, and environmental impacts.  

Woodsworth College is introducing the following two new courses:
(for timetable information please click here)

WDW235H1 Introduction to Digital Humanities (2017 Fall Term)
Instructor:  Alexandra Bolintineanu, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream 

Digital Humanities (DH) studies human culture -- art, literature, history, geography, religion -- using computational tools and methodologies, and at the same time studies digital technologies and communities through humanist lenses, as complex cultural objects shaped by wider social and political concerns and the ways we construct knowledge and meaning.
Prerequisties:  4 FCEs at the 100 level, at least 1 FCE of which must be in Humanities

Overview:  This course will introduce undergraduate students to this emerging field, providing an overview of the study of traditional humanities materials through computational tools and methodologies.  It will also invite students to engage critically with digital tools and cultures: to analyze developments in computer science, data science, and digital culture and their social and cultural implications; and to consider issues of equity, of social and environmental impact raised by digital infrastructures and applications.  Students will be introduced to both the DH field as a whole and to U of T’s distinctive DH research landscape, and they will become familiar with a basic toolbox of DH skills which they will be able to apply to their studies in Majors in many fields.  

WDW236H1 Virtual Worlds: Introduction to Spatial Digital Humanities (2018 Winter Term)
Instructor:  Alexandra Bolintineanu, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
A Digital Humanities perspective on the virtual worlds in which we are increasingly immersed, from scholarly digital archives to video games. We study the theory and methods of geospatial humanities research and explore the technical and cultural implications of computer vision, augmented reality, the Internet of Things, and 3D printing.
Prerequisites:  WDW235H1 or permission of the Program Coordinator

Overview:  In this course, students will become familiar with the technical underpinnings of the virtual worlds in which we are increasingly immersed, from scholarly digital archives to video games, and will gain a theoretical vocabulary for analyzing these virtual worlds as complex cultural objects, configured by and configuring their communities of participants.  They will also undertake a major research project in the spatial Digital Humanities in which they will learn by making.  Students will be able to apply the resulting toolkit of digital concepts and technical platforms to their studies in Majors in many fields.