Digital Humanities

What is Digital Humanities?

Digital humanities (DH) is a discipline at the intersections of the humanities with computing.  DH studies human culture -- art, literature, history, geography, religion -- through computational tools and methodologies; and, in turn, DH studies the digital through humanist lenses.  Digital humanists analyze languages through digital text collections; build digital archives of forbidden booksconstruct video games to study literature; or resurrect historical cities through digital maps.

In our Digital Humanities courses, students learn about the intellectual landscape of digital humanities scholarship.  They also learn a basic Digital Humanities skillset:  how to build digital stories, exhibits, and maps; how to digitize rare books; how to analyze collections of data; how to construct digital models and 3D-print them.  And students gain a critical perspective on digital technologies, learning to consider their social, cultural, and environmental impacts.  

Woodsworth College is introducing the following two new courses:
(for timetable information please click here)

WDW235H1 Introduction to Digital Humanities (2017 Fall Term)
Instructor:  Alexandra Bolintineanu, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream 

Digital Humanities (DH) studies human culture -- art, literature, history, geography, religion -- using computational tools and methodologies, and at the same time studies digital technologies and communities through humanist lenses, as complex cultural objects shaped by wider social and political concerns and the ways we construct knowledge and meaning.
Prerequisties:  4 FCEs at the 100 level, at least 1 FCE of which must be in Humanities

Overview:  This year the course focuses on dangerous books:  hidden, censored, forbidden. We speak to scholars who uncover the earliest forms of English; who build archives of forbidden literature; who image rare books and rescue endangered climate data from politically-motivated oblivion.  We visit the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library and the digitization labs of the Internet Archive. We transform stories into video games and study rare books’ histories through digital exhibits.

By the end of the course, you will have mastered concepts and technologies you can use in future courses and workplaces.  You’ll be familiar with text encoding and data visualization, content management systems and digital exhibit platforms.  And you will learn how our stories and cultural conversations work and shapeshift through digital environments.  

No technical experience needed:  students will learn all course technologies hands-on, in the lab, with instructor assistance.

WDW236H1 Virtual Worlds: Introduction to Spatial Digital Humanities (2018 Winter Term)
Instructor:  Alexandra Bolintineanu, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
A Digital Humanities perspective on the virtual worlds in which we are increasingly immersed, from scholarly digital archives to video games. We study the theory and methods of geospatial humanities research and explore the technical and cultural implications of computer vision, augmented reality, the Internet of Things, and 3D printing.
Prerequisites:  WDW235H1 or permission of the Program Coordinator

Overview:  This course introduces you to virtual worlds in humanities research, from digital maps to 3D printing.

By the end of the course, you will be able to build a digital map and tell a complex multimedia story.  You will understand the workings of virtual and augmented reality.  You will have 3d-printed your own artifacts. And you will learn how virtual worlds shape, and are shaped by, the wider world we live in.

No technical experience needed:  students will learn all course technologies hands-on, in the lab, with instructor assistance.