academic_bridging

Academic Bridging Program Course Descriptions

WDW101Y1 – Canadian History

Description

This course provides a survey of Canada’s political, social, and economic history from European settlement to the near present by studying a range of topics including the history of Canada’s First Nations people, Anglophone-Francophone relations, relations with Great Britain and the United States, and the development of the various structures of modern Canada.

Through lectures and class discussions, students will develop a variety of essential university-level skills, such as how to read critically, analyze problems carefully, think independently, conduct historical research and write a variety of essays. By the end of the course, students will have gained a broad understanding of Canadian history and the skills necessary to pursue university work.

Requirements

This course requires proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking English. The required readings include standard history texts and research materials, Students are also requires to write a variety of essays both in and out of class, including a two-hour mid-term, and a three-hour final examinations. Exclusion: JWH100Y1

Recommendations

Though the specific Bridging course completed will not influence future program selections, this course may be suitable for students who are considering further studies in the Humanities or Social Sciences program such as Anthropology, Cultural or Media studies, International Relations, Political Science, and History.

 

WDW102Y1 – Contemporary Canada

Description

This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to the changing nature of contemporary Canadian society by examining the historical roots of a variety of themes, such as aboriginal issues, regionalism, French-English relations, gender/women’s issues, and immigration/multiculturalism, which are examined in a variety of interdisciplinary sources, including geography, history, politics, literature, and culture.

Through an interactive course format consisting of lectures and class discussions, students are encourages to develop a variety of skills necessary to succeed in university, including how to read fiction and nonfiction critically and how to write a variety of essays . By the end of the course students should possess a broad understanding of Canadian society and sharpened analytical skills

Requirements

This Course requires proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking English. The required readings include a standard text, novels, and a set of online interdisciplinary readings. Students are also required to write a number of essays both in and out of class, including a two-hour mid-term test, and a three-hour final examination. Exclusion: JWU100Y1

Recommendations

Though the specific Bridging course completed will not influence future program selections, this course may be suitable for students who are considering further studies in Humanity’s or Social Sciences programs such as Art, Geography, Political Science, and Sociology or interdisciplinary programs such as Canadian Studies or Woman Studies.

 

WDW103Y1 – Introduction to the Study of Literature

Description

In this course students will learn how to read critically, comprehend more fully, and analyze representative examples of outstanding literary work of drama, poetry, and fiction. They will also learn how to write more clearly and effectively, and how to use the library to do research. This is a Humanities course, and as such addresses major issues of the human condition – love and friendship, aging and death, the natural and social environment, heredity and free will.

The course format consists of lectures and class discussions. Students develop university-level writing and research skills through assignments written in and out of class.

Requirements

This course requires fluency in reading, writing, and speaking English. The course readings are balanced between classic and more modern works, and provide examples of important genres. Students are also required to write a variety of essays, including a two-hour mid-term, and a three-hour final examination. Exclusion: ENG185Y1

Recommendations

Though the specific Bridging course completed will not influence future program selections, this course may be suitable for students who are considering further studies in a Humanities program such as comparative Literature, English, Philosophy, and Writing and Rhetoric.

 

WDW104Y1 – Introduction to Environmental Studies

Description

This interdisciplinary course introduces the major issues regarding the sustainability of the global environment in the face of human development by integrating humanities and social science with the fundamental concept of environmental sciences and focusing on a variety of themes, such as human development and health issues, environmental toxicology, solid and hazardous waste, air and water pollution, climate change, ethical concerns, food resources, renewable energy, conservation and sustainability.

Through the interactive course format of lectures and class discussions, students are taught a variety of university-level skills, such as how to read, think, and analyze critically, to conduct research and to write essays and multiple choice testes. By the end of the course students should possess a broad understanding of the many ways in which humans affect the environment as well as practical solutions for sustainable development.

Requirements

This course requires proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking English. In addition to a variety of readings to be assigned, students are required to write a variety of reports, tests and essays, including a two-hour mid-term and a three hour final examination.

Recommendations

Though the specific Bridging course completed will not influence future program selections, this course may be of interest to students who are considering further studies in Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, Peace and Conflict Studies, Geography, History, Sociology, and Political Science.